Haig&Co: Cloud, PLM and COVID Webinar Series

Do you have questions about PLM platforms, PLM and Cloud, or PLM after COVID ?

Episode 1 : Intro and History of PLM and PLM on Cloud

August 27th 2020 at 16h00 GMT / 11h00 EST / 08h00 PST

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Episode 2 : Common PLM Cloud Questions and Misconceptions

 September 10th 2020 at 16h00 GMT / 11h00 EST / 08h00 PST

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Episode 3 : PLM Cloud Advantages and Vendor Analysis

September 24th 2020 at 16h00 GMT / 11h00 EST / 08h00 PST

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Episode 4 : PLM, Cloud and COVID – Impact on the PLM job market - Fino interviews Haig&Co!

October 8th 2020 at 16h00 GMT / 11h00 EST / 08h00 PST

Extracts : Do you have questions about PLM platforms, PLM and Cloud, or PLM after COVID ?

Extract block 1 :

Upchain was created in 2015 with the explicit intention to be disruptive. Founder John Laslavic saw how in the automotive market, the original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) were vertically integrated which made too many assumptions of proximity between the principal factories and the suppliers. This model is no longer relevant in the 21st century and therefore Upchain was designed for a far more horizontal, fragmented, and heterogeneous ecosystem.
 
Upchain features a unique 16-sided data model that allows for combining things easily and creating virtual profiles on the fly. The intention was to recreate the ease of adaptation and modeling that MatrixOne had before their acquisition by Dassault. It consists of a modern architecture and with the intention not to fall into the trap of tailoring a solution for one specific client and essentially painting themselves into a corner. The solution is multi-tenant with all features available to all users with an on-off style of activation and integrations based on Mulesoft.

Extract 2 :

"One last thing to keep in mind is that what started out as an expensive niche solution for the aerospace and automotive industries quickly applied to other industries as well. Heavy machinery and industrial equipment, agricultural equipment, cruise ships, energy, powerplants, oil platforms, circuit boards, and consumer electronics all became very interested in the potential savings from PLM. Soon, also high-tech, pharmaceuticals, consumer goods, fashion and retail, construction and engineering, and many other industries adopted PLM as well. Some of these new industries did not have a tradition of heavy IT skills and this became a barrier to adoption due to the implicit complexities in PLM deployments."

Extract 3 :

I think that one of the first objections to moving product development to the cloud is the concern around the security of the invaluable Intellectual Property (IP) which is no longer safeguarded in the dark, dusty machine room. Is this a legitimate concern? Yes and no. Yes, this means that if the cloud-based PLM system is hacked, potential competitors lacking in integrity could steal designs and so forth. In my mind, this is potentially an issue but with low probability. First off, the dark, dusty machine room rarely has adequate security and the most common IP theft comes from disgruntled or corrupt employees shoving a USB key in the back of the server and then taking a plane out of the country... I feel that, in terms of data security, the cloud is potentially equally secure if all disaster recovery, encryption, and hardening of identity management and virtual machines are implemented rigorously. 

Extract 4 :

As our world changes due to the COVID pandemic, using technology to facilitate social distancing while maintaining productivity and promote collaboration is an absolutely critical challenge. Cloud computing opens the door to efficient, secure remote working and collaboration and PLM allows the massive transformation of manual development processes into digital threads and digital twins. The combination of the two can be a tipping point for companies on their digital journey.

Extract 5 :

"One last thing to keep in mind is that what started out as an expensive niche solution for the aerospace and automotive industries quickly applied to other industries as well. Heavy machinery and industrial equipment, agricultural equipment, cruise ships, energy, powerplants, oil platforms, circuit boards, and consumer electronics all became very interested in the potential savings from PLM. Soon, also high-tech, pharmaceuticals, consumer goods, fashion and retail, construction and engineering, and many other industries adopted PLM as well. Some of these new industries did not have a tradition of heavy IT skills and this became a barrier to adoption due to the implicit complexities in PLM deployments."

Extract 6 :

I think that one of the first objections to moving product development to the cloud is the concern around the security of the invaluable Intellectual Property (IP) which is no longer safeguarded in the dark, dusty machine room. Is this a legitimate concern? Yes and no. Yes, this means that if the cloud-based PLM system is hacked, potential competitors lacking in integrity could steal designs and so forth. In my mind, this is potentially an issue but with low probability. First off, the dark, dusty machine room rarely has adequate security and the most common IP theft comes from disgruntled or corrupt employees shoving a USB key in the back of the server and then taking a plane out of the country... I feel that, in terms of data security, the cloud is potentially equally secure if all disaster recovery, encryption, and hardening of identity management and virtual machines are implemented rigorously. 

Extract 7 :

To the question, my CRM and HR systems are on the cloud, so why is it so hard to move my PLM to the cloud?

Customer Relationship Management (CRM) is a totally different animal than PLM. The data used by CRM is primarily user input into forms, surveys, etc. whereas PLM deals in multiple complex external formats and files that are typically much larger than an HTML form can encapsulate. CRM is highly collaborative and relatively self-contained, particularly when we look at SalesForce which also includes basic human resources (HR), billing, and accounting pieces. PLM is dealing in physical objects: planes, trains, and automobiles but also labeling, pharmaceuticals, oil rigs, etc. and is connected to CAD and ERP systems as well as systems such as manufacturing execution (MES) and maintenance, repair, and operations (MRO). The data that PLM manages changes at a much faster rate as well – every modification on a design, no matter how small, by any designer or engineer updates the PLM system which can amount to tens of thousands of changes per day or more. These all make PLM on cloud a much different animal than CRM on the cloud
 

Demystifying SaaS-based PLM :
Cloud and PLM in the Era of COVID

Cloud has been a hot topic in Product Lifecycle Management (PLM) for quite some time. With the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, this movement will accelerate as companies move forward their digital initiatives to minimize physical contact while increasing collaboration. This book will talk briefly about the history of PLM and cloud computing and attempt to dispel some myths about cloud that are commonly circulating. It will talk about today’s SaaS PLM platforms. I will then give some pros and cons of leveraging cloud technologies before giving you a list of self-assessment questions about the risks involved in moving your PLM to the cloud.

 Cloud and PLM in the Era of COVID